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When Cesar (Luis Tosar) finds one tenant is harder to upset than the others, his behaviour escalates until he’s committing unimaginably grotesque crimes against the poor girl. Probably the best horror anthology ever made, this Ealing Studios production includes five individual stories and one wrap-around narrative.The wrap-around sees a consultant arrive at a country home only to find that he recognises all of the guests at the house – he’s seen them all in a dream.

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A group of explorers heads deep into the Paris catacombs, only to find they’ve gone a little too deep and stumbled into an alternate dimension that might actually be Hell.Spooked, the guests start recounting their own stories of the uncanny, each more unnerving than the last. Nina (Fiona O’Shaughnessy) died in a car crash, which is bad enough, but when he tentatively begins a relationship with his co-worker, Holly (Abigail Hardingham), he finds himself haunted by Nina. She materialises in his bed every time he and Holly have sex – she might be dead, but she’s not letting go.Well, except for the one about the golfers, but that one’s just there for light relief before the film hits you with the scariest ventriloquist’s dummy ever committed to film. 'Creepy' doesn’t feel like a strong enough word to describe this film – 'devastating' might do it.It’s a brilliantly over the top concept, and the way it plays out is incredibly eerie.Yes, it’s found footage, and yes, it’s a little bit on the silly side – it chucks in quotes from Dante and a few too many sad-faced ghosts – but some of the scares along the way are properly frightening. Eleven years ago, Alan (Rory Cochrane) bought an antique mirror… According to the police, they were murdered by their 10-year-old son.A couple of Londoners holidaying in Cornwall stumble across a gorgeous abandoned house on the seafront and immediately decide they want to buy it.

The owner, a grumpy old colonel, is happy to sell it to them on the spot, but his granddaughter is reluctant.

is a period piece, and the language is suitably archaic, but don’t let that put you off: it’s a brilliantly chilling portrayal of Puritan life, where belief can mean the difference between life and death, and horror is only ever one failed crop away. If you were only ever going to watch one haunted house movie, it should be this one, because this is the archetypal story: a family moves into a house where horrible murders happened, and then bad things happen to them.

It manages a lot of things later imitators didn’t, though, which is that it makes the Lutzes’ decision to buy the house make sense, and also builds the horror slowly, so that they almost don’t notice when the things going wrong in the house switch from annoying niggles to outright horror.

Tree surgeon Adam and his family move into an ancient farmhouse to start sizing up the land for developers and quickly fall afoul of the supernatural creatures lurking in the trees, which turns out to be a really bad idea.

This film’s got it all: foreboding mythology, grotesque body horror, and the most amazing line of foreshadowing dialogue you’ll ever hear.

But inadvertently puts both of them in danger all over again. The way director Mike Flanagan plays with reality, building unbearable uncertainty through camera angles and false memories, makes this film both incredibly scary and impossibly sad.